Alastair Borthwick Life as a Journalist

Alastair Borthwick was born in February 1913 in Rutherglen, Lanarkshire, and grew in the Ayrshire Coastal town of Troon. Immediately after leaving Glasgow High School at the age of 16 years, he became a telephone boy with the Glasgow Evening Herald, recording the responses from the callers. He then received a promotion to be an editor and a writer of the Glasgow Weekly Herald; a 28 pages article written by five writers. Borthwick dealt with writing and editing Children’s Page, Film Reviews, Readers’ Queries, Readers’ Letters, and Women’s Page.

Borthwick was a Scottish author and journalist whose articles led to the promotion of a mountain hiking. While working in the Glasgow Borthwick, he mentored many employed and unemployed people through his article about the mountain climbing and hiking in Scotland. He also narrated and gave the importance of mountain hiking in his article ‘Always Little Further.’ He stressed, depicted and treasured the time of the social change among Scotlands. He used interesting, funny, entertaining means to describe different enjoyments and what one would gain during the hills hiking.

Borthwick worked in British Army divisions in Sicily, Western Europe, and North Africa during the Second World War. He served as an Intelligence Officer and later as the captain. He was promoted to be a Reconnaissance Corps on 14 January 1941. Also, he worked with the 5th Seaforth Highlanders in 1944, in addition to leading the battalion to conquer their enemies. After the war, he wrote the book ‘San Peur,’ which covers the history about his encounters and the Seaforth Highlanders during the Second World War. At one time, the Germans noticed that the Seaforths were dug behind them, only one and a half miles next to where they had positioned their soldiers. Borthwick as their leader admitted that he had pulled off navigation.

In his career as a journalist, Borthwick worked in different media whereby he focused on radio and television broadcasting, in addition to writing, editing and presenting programmes. According to Borthwick while addressing the producer James Ferguson, he had been hiking during the weekends. In 1952 New Year Honors, he won an appointment as the Officer of the Order of British Empire (OBE).

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